Conventions can be hard to chronicle. There’s a lot going on, and epic crowds to wade through between events, which for any convention of real size, might be pretty far apart physically. It’s no different for the press — while we might enjoy certain privileges like skipping lines and interviewing guests, there are still a ton of events to potentially cover and not a lot of manpower to do it. Not to mention, we too have puzzle panels to complete on our 3DSes, and that 10 person queue for Street Pass hits fills up fast. But I digress.

This year, Anime Herald brings you our typical blitz of news, cosplay encounters, and guest interviews, but I’d also like to give you all a peek at what we actually did, at least insofar as the moments I was smart enough to put my camera to work. Enjoy! (We hope.)

Each Anime Boston opens with its mascots: A-chan and B-kun! I bet you can’t guess what the A and B stand for. I’ll give you a moment.

Each Anime Boston opens with its mascots: A-chan and B-kun! I bet you can’t guess what the A and B stand for. I’ll give you a moment.

Tom Wayland is, in a way, AB’s secondary mascot, and a perennial guest at the convention. Each year he makes a blasphemous video about the Red Sox, but this year he was forced to acknowledge the power of Boston Strong, and beards. Awwww, yeah.

Tom Wayland is, in a way, AB’s secondary mascot, and a perennial guest at the convention. Each year he makes a blasphemous video about the Red Sox, but this year he was forced to acknowledge the power of Boston Strong, and beards. Awwww, yeah.

Tom Wayland is, in a way, AB’s secondary mascot, and a perennial guest at the convention. Each year he makes a blasphemous video about the Red Sox, but this year he was forced to acknowledge the power of Boston Strong, and beards. Awwww, yeah.

Tom Wayland is, in a way, AB’s secondary mascot, and a perennial guest at the convention. Each year he makes a blasphemous video about the Red Sox, but this year he was forced to acknowledge the power of Boston Strong, and beards. Awwww, yeah.

 

For me, the first event I just have to go to at each AB is Anime Unscripted, a “Who’s Line is it Anyway?” style show with selected convention guests. Here’s Christina Vee giving Patrick Seitz her best satanic psycho Tourette’s look.

For me, the first event I just have to go to at each AB is Anime Unscripted, a “Who’s Line is it Anyway?” style show with selected convention guests. Here’s Christina Vee giving Patrick Seitz her best satanic psycho Tourette’s look.

 

In this sketch, Seitz is the horse from the Godfather, and John Stocker (off camera) just directed Vee to act more ballsy while bringing in tools for the deed. The game is “Director”.

In this sketch, Seitz is the horse from the Godfather, and John Stocker (off camera) just directed Vee to act more ballsy while bringing in tools for the deed. The game is “Director”.

 

Matthew Mercer fighting back laughter.

Matthew Mercer fighting back laughter.

 

Our hosts for the evening: Jekka Cormier and Patrick Delahanty

Our hosts for the evening: Jekka Cormier and Patrick Delahanty

After Unscripted, it was a couple short hours before the next main event: The JAM Project group concert! JAM is a unique grouping of veteran and budding solo artists who work together specifically to make songs for anime.

After Unscripted, it was a couple short hours before the next main event: The JAM Project group concert! JAM is a unique grouping of veteran and budding solo artists who work together specifically to make songs for anime.

Hiroshi Kitadani began his solo career in the late ’90s, and first popped onto the anime scene with “We Are!”, a One Piece theme song.

Hiroshi Kitadani began his solo career in the late ’90s, and first popped onto the anime scene with “We Are!”, a One Piece theme song.

 

Masami Okui and Hironobu Kageyama. Okui-san is a prolific singer/songwriter with quite a few anime songs under her belt, including themes for Revolutionary Girl Utena and The Slayers.

Masami Okui and Hironobu Kageyama. Okui-san is a prolific singer/songwriter with quite a few anime songs under her belt, including themes for Revolutionary Girl Utena and The Slayers.

AB2014-11

Kageyama-san is a fixture of the anime scene — known as “Mr. DBZ” (for the fact that he performed most of the songs), he has been a popular musician since the 1980s and done numerous other songs for anime. He is one of the founding members of JAM Project.

AB2014-12

Masaaki Endoh is another founding member of JAM, which has been a major part of his career. He has performed themes for a number of super robot shows, including GaoGaiGar.

AB2014-13

What impressed me about JAM is how they bring everything they’ve got to the stage and give it all away before they leave. It’s also really apparent how much they enjoy performing together.

AB2014-14

The show was high energy from start to finish.

AB2014-15

Last but not least, Yoshiki Fukuyama (left), another veteran of the anime scene, is perhaps best known for his vocals in the group Fire Bomber, from Macross 7. Like Kageyama-san, Fukuyama-san has been around since the early ’80s.

The main hall outside the dealer’s room had its dangerous elements.

The main hall outside the dealer’s room had its dangerous elements.

AB2014-17

However, it was the only road to Swag City!

AB2014-18

On the last day of the convention, this kind sailor showed me the way to the last panel I would attend…

AB2014-19

“From East to West: the superheroes of America and Japan,” hosted by Ken Haley of Comic Book Resource, and Anime Herald’s benevolent dictator, Mike Ferreira!

As with the last time I made it up to Boston, Anime Boston was a whirlwind of geeky pleasure, over all too quickly. A quick thanks to the AB staff, who despite the bag checks and in some cases long lines made it an enjoyable experience as usual.  And special thanks to Jamison Chew, for all that he does to keep the press both happy and able to be effective. You rock, Jamison!

I can’t wait to see what AB has in store for 2015.  Until then, peace out, bros and bro-ettes.