News Reporting

Osomatsu-san Episode 1 To Be Pulled From Digital Circulation


Osomatsu-san Visual 001 - 20151104This hilarious series is suffering through some truly tragic censorship.

Earlier today, The official Osomatsu-san (Mr. Osomatsu) anime website declared that the show’s first Blu-Ray/DVD volume will omit the first episode. In addition, the second and third episode will be completely reworked for the release.

Furthermore, the Osomatsu-san staff reported that the show’s production committee will pull the first episode from streaming sites. The episode will be pulled from the following sites on November 12, at midnight local time:

  • dTV
  • Ani Tele Theater
  • Rakuten ShowTime
  • Video Market
  • U-NEXT
  • Anime Hōdai
  • Bandai Channel
  • J:COM On Demand
  • Video Pass
  • milplus
  • Auhikari
  • iTSCOM On Demand
  • TOKAI On Demand
  • Actvilla
  • Hikari TV
  • PlayStation Video
  • TSUTAYA TV
  • DMM.com
  • GYAO!
  • Niconico Video
  • d Anime Store

On October 29, TV Tokyo held a press conference regarding the show. During the conference, TV Tokyo’s Yūichi Takahashi apologized for the third episode, which contains a lewd parody of children’s character Anpanman, in addition to spoofs of Saw and a number of other properties.

Osomatsu-san - Dekapan Man - 001 - 20151104

The first two episodes also contained numerous parodies of popular shows, including Attack on Titan, Sailor Moon, and Boys Over Flowers.

Osomatsu-san 002 - 20151104

Japan’s copyright law doesn’t include a parody provision, meaning that spoofs and satire of copyrighted works are not protected speech. Rather, creators have three moral rights:

  • Divulgence: The rights holder can decide exactly when and how his/her work is made available to the public
  • Authorship: The rights holder can choose how s/he is represented in the work, whether it’s under a real name, a pseudonym, or anonymously.
  • Integrity: The rights holder controls how a work appears, and all modifications to his/her work.

Because of this, parodic works are treated as infringing works, due to a violation of the Integrity clause. Because of this, all parodic works require creator consent.

Osomatsu-san is based on the late Fujio Akatsuka’s manga of the same name. The series is being directed by Yoichi Fujita at Studio Pierrot. Naoyuki Asano is providing character designs, while Shū Matsubara handles series composition. The show kicked off on October 5, as a celebration of what would be Akatsuka’s 80th birthday.

In North America, Crunchyroll is streaming the series as it airs in Japan.

Japanese culture blog Esuteru published a comparison shot between the original and edited versions of the Dekapan-man sketches, which you can check out below. The edited version is represented in the left set of images:

Osomatsu-san - Dekapan Man - 002 - 20151104

Source: Anime News Network

About the author

Samantha Ferreira

Samantha Ferreira is Anime Herald’s founder and editor-in-chief. A Rhode Island native, Samantha has been an anime fan since 1992, and an active member of the anime press since 2002, when she began working as a reviewer for Anime Dream. She launched Anime Herald in 2010, and continues to oversee its operations to this day. Outside of journalism, Samantha actively studies the history of the North American anime fandom and industry, with a particular focus on the 2000s anime boom and bust. She’s a huge fan of all things Sakura Wars, and maintains series fansite Combat Revue Review when she has free time available. When not in the Anime Herald Discord, Samantha can typically be found on Bluesky.

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