News Reporting

“Seven Deadly Sins” Gets New Anime TV Series


What’s in the box? What’s in the box?! Oh, wait… it’s good news this time!

The latest issue of Kodansha’s Weekly Shōnen Magazine (Issues 43) reveals that Nakaba Suzuki’s The Seven Deadly Sins (Nanatsu no Taizai) will receive a new anime series. No details on the work are known at this point, aside from the fact that it’s a TV series.

seven-deadly-sins-tv-anime-confirmation-20160917

The news comes at the tail end of four-episode special The Seven Deadly Sins -Signs of Holy War-, which began airing on August 28. The special, which features an original story by Suzuki, ends tomorrow.

The first Seven Deadly Sins anime series in Japan in the fall 2014 broadcast season. Tensai Okamura (Blue Exorcist, Darker than Black) directed the project at A-1 Pictures. Keigo Sasaki (Night Raid 1931, Blue Exorcist) provided character designs, while Shôtarô Suga was in charge of series composition. Netflix currently streams the show as a Netflix Original.

Netflix describes the show as: “When a kingdom is taken over by tyrants, the deposed princess begins a quest to find a disbanded group of evil knights to help take back her realm.”

The Seven Deadly Sins manga began in the pages of Weekly Shōnen Magazine in 2012. The series currently spans 22 collected volumes, with the most recent hitting stores on August 17. Volume 23 will ship to retailers on October 17.

In North America, Kodansha Comics currently holds the rights to the Seven Deadly Sins manga. They’ve shipped 16 volumes to date, with the most recent hitting stores on September 6. In addition, Crunchyroll is publishing chapters of the title as they run in Japan.

Source: Yaraon!

About the author

Samantha Ferreira

Samantha Ferreira is Anime Herald’s founder and editor-in-chief. A Rhode Island native, Samantha has been an anime fan since 1992, and an active member of the anime press since 2002, when she began working as a reviewer for Anime Dream. She launched Anime Herald in 2010, and continues to oversee its operations to this day. Outside of journalism, Samantha actively studies the history of the North American anime fandom and industry, with a particular focus on the 2000s anime boom and bust. She’s a huge fan of all things Sakura Wars, and maintains series fansite Combat Revue Review when she has free time available. When not in the Anime Herald Discord, Samantha can typically be found on Bluesky.

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